Friday is a Sweet Treat!

12 10 2012

This morning Gunna Sigga made us traditional Icelandic Pönnukökur during our morning coffee and tea break! Icelandic pancakes are different from what people call pancakes in many parts of the world; they are small, round, thin and sweet and are either rolled up with sugar or wrapped up in squares filled with jam and whipped cream.

To make these pancakes, a special tool is required; a custom-made frying pan. And an expert like Gunna Sigga!

Heat the frying pan on medium heat on the stove. A little bit of butter or oil may be necessary to prevent the dough from sticking to the surface of the pan. When the pan is hot enough, pour about half a ladle of dough into the pan and distribute it as quickly and evenly as possible.

When the pancake is dry on top, it is time to flip it. If you’re feeling adventurous, you can try flipping the pancake by tossing it into the air and catching it again with the pan, fried side up, but if you’d rather be safe then sorry, use a spatula. When both sides of the pancake have a golden color, it is ready. The trick is to use as little dough as possible but still enough to cover the whole pan. According to legend, experienced housewives made pancakes so thin that they could read the daily newspaper Morgunbladid through them.

Pönnukökur rolled with sugar!

To fill, distribute sugar evenly over the pancake. Then roll it up tightly. Or whip some cream and have it filled with blueberry jam. Smear the jam evenly over the surface of the pancake, and then add two heaped tablespoons of cream. Be careful not to add too much cream or you will have a disaster on your hands. Fold the pancake twice until it has formed a square and continue until the pile is finished.

Instructions from Eygló Svala Arnarsdóttir

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One response

11 12 2012
mfpservices

Bonjour ! Un très bon article. Tant sur la forme que sur le fond. Connaissez-vous des blogs spécialisés à me recommander ?

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