Nauthólsvík Beach

20 05 2013
Following WWII Nauthólsvík was a place for seabathing, but it was banned because of pollution. In the 80‘s the “hot stream”, Heiti Lækurinn, that runs from some hot water reservoir tanks situated close by, was very popular until it was closed in 1985. The Geothermal beach was opened in the summer of 2000, the service center, with changing rooms, showers, hot tubs and  refreshments was opened 2001.
There are around 120.000 guests in average who attend the thermal beach each year. So it is save to say that the beach has firmly put it's mark as the paradise of the city landscape which equally attracts locals as well as foreign guests.

There are around 120.000 guests in average who attend the thermal beach each year. So it is save to say that the beach has firmly put it’s mark as the paradise of the city landscape which equally attracts locals as well as foreign guests.

Massive sea walls were built and golden shellsand was pumped inside them. Within the walls is a beautiful lagoon where the cold sea and geothermal water become as one. These surroundings remind more of the beaches of the Mediterranean ocean than a small bay in the northest capital of the world located in the North-Atlantic ocean. The goal of these constructions was to build a diverse outdoor recreational area with a focus point on outdoor activities, sunbathing, sea baths and sailing in homage of former use of the area.
The lagoon may be heated but it is a fad to swim outside the walls... in a cap, gloves, booties, and self-knit swimsuit!

The lagoon may be heated but it is a fad to swim outside the walls… in a cap, gloves, booties, and self-knit swimsuit!

Geothermical water from Reykjavík Energy is provided into two hot tubs as into the sea in the bay which has been separated with a wall to the east to minimize the water change. A part of the bay is still open and allows the sea to mix with the geothermial water. The lagoon is 1.500-4.000 m2 depending on the tide. The hot water is not mixed with chlorine. The seawater in the lagoon is around 5°-16°C and the hot tubs are around 30°-39°C hot. But they are quick to point out long sessions in the pool can cause hypothermia, especially when there are children involved. And beware of the fact that the lagoon is only heated during opening hours.
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