18 06 2013

Apart from space heating, one of Iceland’s oldest and most important usages of geothermal energy is for heating greenhouses. For years, naturally warm soil has been used for growing potatoes and other vegetables. Heating greenhouses using geothermal energy began in Iceland in 1924. The majority of Iceland’s greenhouses are located in the south, and most are enclosed in glass. It is common to use inert growing media (volcanic scoria, rhyolite) on concrete floors with individual plant watering. Geothermal steam is commonly used to boil and disinfect the soil. The increasing use of electric lighting in recent years has extended the growing season and improved greenhouse utilization. This development has been encouraged through governmental subsidies spent on electricity for lighting. CO2 enrichment in greenhouses is also common, primarily though CO2 produced in the geothermal plant at Hædarendi.Greenhouse production is divided between different types of vegetables (tomatoes, cucumbers, peppers, etc.) and flowers for the domestic market (roses, potted plants, etc.). Production of domestic tomatoes has exceeded consumption and some are shipped to the UK!

South of Húsavík is Reykjahverfi, where there is extensive greenhouse cultivation by means of geothermal heating as well as a swimming pool and a community centre. Its main geothermal source is at Hveravellir from where geothermal water is piped to Húsavík, providing central heating for all the buildings in the town.

South of Húsavík is Reykjahverfi, where there is extensive greenhouse cultivation by means of geothermal heating as well as a swimming pool and a community centre. Its main geothermal source is at Hveravellir from where geothermal water is piped to Húsavík, providing central heating for all the buildings in the town.

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