Drifting From Siberia

29 07 2013

Driftwood is an important resource in Iceland where native forests are composed largely of short-statured birch (Betula spp.) and willow (Salix spp.) with the occasional emergent rowan (Sorbus accuparia). Driftwood is most common along the north coast of Iceland where currents from the Arctic carry and deposit logs that originate in Siberia. The key driftwood species that arrive in Iceland include larch (Larix sp.), spruce (Picea sp.) and pine (Pinus spp.), a journey that takes approximately five years. Much of the driftwood originates from forests along Siberian rivers but some wood, particularly pine, comes from logs lost from timber rafts during transport after harvest.

After a five year journey, driftwood from Russian Siberia washes up along certain Icelandic shorelines.

After a five year journey, driftwood from Russian Siberia washes up along certain Icelandic shorelines, while others are barren.

Driftwood has been used for centuries in Iceland as fuel and as construction material for boats, houses,  fish drying racks and fences - as seen here.

Driftwood has been used for centuries in Iceland as fuel and as construction material for boats, houses, fish drying racks and fences – as seen here.

 

Advertisements

Actions

Information

One response

6 08 2013
rushofsun

I remember seeing so much on the eastern side of the West Fjords.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s




%d bloggers like this: